St. Chad's Anglican Church stained glass window

St. Chad’s Day — March 2
(and observance Sunday, March 1)

Saint Chad of LichfieldThe celebration for St. Chad, the seventh century bishop of Lichfield, England (born about 620), and our namesake, will be Sunday, March 1.

Historically, Chad is perhaps best known for not being Archbishop of York. In mid-life he returned to Northumbria, being called by its king to be chief bishop there (thus, Archbishop of York). He was elected, and duly installed, but various persons raised objections (on the grounds that his consecrators were bishops who followed the Celtic church calendar and customs rather than the customs then being imported from the continent and from Rome — this being a major source of animus at the time in Britain). Not wishing to cause division in the Church, Chad withdrew.

His tendency to walk rather than ride a horse was a deliberate attempt by Chad to operate at the level of the peasants for whom he cared. He seems to have won his saintship by this, and by the power of his praying.

Almighty God, whose servant Chad, for the peace of the Church, relinquished cheerfully the honors that had been thrust upon him, only to be rewarded with equal responsibility: Keep us, we pray, from thinking of ourselves more highly than we ought to think, and ready at all times to step aside for others, that the cause of Christ may be advanced and Your blessed kingdom enlarged, in the name of Him who washed his disciples' feet, even Jesus Christ Our Lord. Amen.



Our thanks to Fr. Border

We offer many heartfelt thanks to Father James Bordner’s ineffable and selfless help filling in for Fr. Don, while he recuperated. Fr. Bordner is from St. James Anglican Catholic Church, in central San Antonio, which, like St. Chad’s, continues to use the 1928 Book of Common Prayer for traditional Anglican Catholic worship. If you find yourself in that part of town away from St. Chad's some day, it would be fitting and amicable to give them a visit for their Sunday noon services.

O GOD, who dost ever hallow and protect thy Church; Raise up therein, through thy Spirit, good and faithful stewards of the mysteries of Christ, that by their ministry and example thy people may abide in thy favour and be guided in the way of truth; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee in the unity of the same Spirit ever, one God, world without end. Amen.


The Book of Common Prayer — Digital Version

The 1928 Book of Common Prayer can be downloaded here in PDF format (size roughly 2 Mb). This is handy if you would like to easily keep a digital version either on your home computer, tablet or smart phone. This is very handy, for example, when you are out and want to find a very good prayer or traveling and conveniently have the Offices of Morning and Evening Prayer with you. (If the file opens in your browser instead of downloading, you probably simply need to right-click on the link and choose "SAVE AS" or "DOWNLOAD LINK" — the actual words depending on which browser you are using.)


True, Traditional Anglican Worship

Set on a quiet street among a grove of trees in a major Texas city, is a native stone Anglican Church. This is St. Chad’s Parish Church, which offers the worship services of this historic faith.

The Anglican worship services held here are much unchanged from the adoption of rites into the English language by Archbishop Thomas Cranmer in 1549; codified by Queen Elizabeth 1 in 1558, and authorized by Parliament in 1662. These Anglican services, after a few adjustments, were authorized in 1928 for the American Church. Through the successive consecration of its bishops, this Church can trace its origin back to the Apostles, and first century Christianity.

Established in 1992, St. Chad’s Parish was named for the seventh century bishop of Lichfield, England. This Parish is home for all worship, baptism, confirmation, marriage, and funeral services, as well as the fellowship, visitation, and spiritual care of its members. St. Chad’s is also a sponsor of an annual Mission to Nigeria by Bishop Ebenezer Manuagwu.

Inside this Parish Church is a warm, friendly place that meets every need for Christian assembly, worship, and fellowship. The chancel contains furniture imported from England, including the altar, the altar rail, prayer desks, and the Bishops chair; artistically hand carved cabinetwork in beautiful quarter-sawn English brown oak. This furniture was purchased from a Parish in England that closed there many years ago, and is believed to be over 200 years old.

Above the altar is a stained glass window representing the four Evangelists and other spiritual references. The window was designed and built by a Parish member, and complements the worship center of the sanctuary.

All are welcome here. The Holy Eucharist is celebrated twice on Sundays; at 8:00 a.m. and at 10:30 a.m.

Celebrate the 400th Anniversary of the King James Bible!

First Edition 1611 King James Bible pageMay 2011 marked 400 years since the first publishing of the King James Bible. This enormous work is acknowledged to be one of the greatest influences on the English language, and the English Church at its beginning, and then as a Scripture source for nearly all of the Christian world. A visit to the Internet shows that the 400th anniversary of the 1611 King James Bible is being observed all over the world.

The King James Bible is the source of the Propers in the Book of Common Prayer, the Scripture source that we live, learn, and worship by every day of our lives.

First Edition 1611 King James Bible display at St. Chad'sWe are pleased to add observance of this work. St. Chad’s has set up a display of an original page from the very first edition of the King James Bible from 1611. It shows this actual page, a certificate of authenticity and pages detailing some history of this momentous achievement.

Due to the popularity of the exhibit, it will be available indefinitely.

Fr. Don


St. Chad’s on Facebook

St. Chad's is on FacebookFollow St. Chad’s on Facebook. We occasionally post updates and photos and such. Stop by our Facebook page to see. If you are a member of Facebook, you can "Like" us (a slightly odd term) and follow our posts and activities.